homeschooling

Learning Tagalog

My daughter would rather do 10 hours of math than five minutes of Tagalog lessons. She knows a total of – let me see – seven Tagalog words. She knows siya (that person), ikaw (you), ako (me), bata (child), lalaki (boy), babae (girl), and matanda (old).

This is a problem because first, she’s Filipino and Tagalog is our national language and second, the government requires certain subjects to be taught in Tagalog.

I need to be extra creative whenever we have our language lessons since she doesn’t really want to learn. For a lesson on body parts, I drew a girl on a large mirror in our dining room. I called out body parts and she would try to hit it with wet tissue paper.

It was a mess, but that’s the way kids like it, right?

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homeschooling

Montessori at Home

Getting used to 3D shapes #hitormissus #presentparenting #montessoriathome

A post shared by Carla Aritao (@hitormissus) on

Did you know that a three dimensional oval is called an ovoid? It comes from The Latin word ovum, which means egg.  I did not know this until I purchased these Montessori toys online. I had to research what these shapes are called.

In this video, Raf is learning the process of placing an object from one container to the other.

It always surprises me how engaged he can be, even if the materials he’s working on don’t really have any colors, sounds, or lights. But, I guess that’s pretty much one of the beliefs of the Montessori system: no unnecessary distractions.